Linderhof


Gardening, Cooking and Decorating on the Prairie of Kansas


Welcome to Linderhof, our 1920's home on the prairie, where there's usually something in the oven, flowers in the garden for tabletops and herbs in the garden for cooking. Where, when company comes, the teapot is always on and there are cookies and cakes to share in the larder.

Saturday, July 7, 2012

The Kitchen Window


The kitchen window in summer.     

The view from the kitchen sink




 Tomatoes on the sill.    Because my mother (and grandmother) always did.     House plants -- herbs live here in winter but plants that make me smile live here in summer -- an old fashioned Christmas cactus which was a gift from a dear friend, a violet of my mother's, and a myrtle topiary in a hand thrown pot which I brought back last year from England.    I think I finally may have figured out how to grow these little plants.    I've had it since early April and it not only lives but it thrives -- so much so that I think it needs a haircut, a trim!

To the right of the window is an old crock in which I make my tutti fruiti.   It's hand in the summer so it's easy to add the 2 cups of fruits as they come in season along with an equal amount of sugar.     And at hand, too, so that you can stir the mixture daily with a wooden spoon.     Once all the fruits are in, it will go down to the fruit cellar to be used on cakes and ice creams all winter long.

And hanging from the top of the window is the "fly trap".     It's a part of summer as well.


Some things work as well in the 21st Century as they did in the 19th

It's hand blown glass with a hole in the bottom and a cork in the top.     Sugar water is added and the flies (or wasps) crawl in and drown in the sugar water.

When friend Shirley Ann and I went to Natchez years ago we found this fly trap often in the kitchens or larders of the  Plantation Homes that we toured.     We both decided that we "needed" one and although we didn't buy them there, I feel like it is a remembrance of that trip.

I put mine up in the kitchen every summer.    It does trap some flies that manage to get in the house (husband Jim is good at swatting the others) and I like the sun shining through the blue water.

I love how the house changes with the seasons.     From herbs on the windowsill in the winter to tomatoes in the summer, the kitchen window is a barometer of the seasonal change on the prairie of Kansas.

It's Sunday and I'm joining the Tablescaper for Seasonal Sunday.

20 comments:

Bernideen said...

That is really a great piece! Darling post for the season!

Deb said...

And your windows, themselves, are gorgeous, too. What a view you have.

~Gardener on Sherlock Street said...

The changing windowsill...decorated for the season. Perfect.
Do you add blue food coloring to the sugar water to get the nice color?

Martha said...

I do -- just because I like blue -- you could "color coordinate" the water to your kitchen.

From the Kitchen said...

Tomatoes on the windowsill=summer. My mother and grandmother did the same and so do I. If you discover the secret of the topiary, I hope you will share.

Best,
Bonnie

On Crooked Creek said...

Martha,
Tomatoes in the windowsill...brings back memories of life on your side of the Prairie. I have no window in the kitchen here.I voiced my opinion, but was vetoed when making this homes purchase. Ha! We do have a double patio door that opens to the deck, so I count my blessings each day! Thanks for your sweet comment today and your faithful visits. Now where IS this treasure trove you mentioned??? Please plan a visit next time you come to this side of the Prairie...the Guest Room is ready and waiting, dear friend.
Fondly,
Pat

Ann from On Sutton Place said...

I put my tomatoes on the windowsill too. Happy Sunday!

Pondside said...

When I have tomatoes, there they are, on the window sill - such a lovely connection with so many other bloggers. Your fly trap is quite ingenious.

Tea Party said...

What a sweet post. My Gramma had a beautiful Christmas cactus, and she also had a Rosary plant that she had on a shelf high above the bathtub. It was a wonderful long bead like plant, I thought it very special. Gram and my mom put their tomatoes on the sill too, as do I...thanks for sparking such fun old memories and a quick skip down memory lane. Gram's fly catcher wasn't as pretty as yours...like yours much better! So nice that it reminds you of fun times. Just want to say thank you, I look forward to your post every day...

The Tablescaper said...

Love the idea of your fly trap. It's sure a more elegant way of handling the pesky summer problems.

- The Tablescaper

Martha said...

The myrtle topiary is in a small pot. I keep it moist and make sure there is always water in the saucer. That moisture seems to do the trick! I've had this topiary longer than any other -- they usually die within the first month!

The Hinsons said...

I know this is a stupid question but if there's a hole in the bottom and a cork in the top, how does the liquid stay in?

Martha said...

The liquid forms a "moat" around the whole because the whole is higher than the water level. Which is why there is just that little bit of water in it.

Mary said...

Cool blue bug getter and nice post. You have a very nice blog, love the name, too. I just joined you, please come by. Mary

thickethouse said...

Been on vacation and really missed your blog...I could check email at the local library, but all blogs were blocked. And though you have your own domain, even though I could read the text your pictures were blocked out. Now your wonderful pictures are such an important part of your blog, Martha. I was quite frustrated with this state of things. What was your post on crystals with the pictures unavailable. I now have several great posts of yours to read all at once. What joy!

Tammy at Tammy Loves Dishes said...

What a cool looking fly catcher! I think I need to get one of these. Whenever a fly gets into the house it drives our two Scotties to distraction until it is gone. They are like two crazy animals trying to catch the intruder.

The Hinsons said...

Thanks so much for your explanation. I couldn't tell that from the photo but that makes perfect sense. Glad I wasn't too embarrassed to ask-ha.

podso said...

Love your kitchen window! And your tomatoes there look promising!

Jojo said...

I love the flycatcher! It is significant that you captured the season in your window and you've noted it. As I gotten older I've realized signs of home that are embedded in my memory and I don't remember even noticing them at the time. Now they are meaningful memories.

M Johns said...

I love houses that change with the seasons, too. Your window is lovely. I want to be there.

Mimi from FKIA